Don’t Come Back: a funny travel adventure of bad-tempered baboons, black magic, and breakups. (Weird Travel Book 2)

October 12, 2019 - Comment

Can a spam e-mail change your life? Adam Fletcher sure hopes so, because his life is a mess. He’s lost: His home… His girlfriend of nine years… His love of travel… His hair, and much of his confidence But then, during an argument with his deeply irritating friend Nick, he checks his spam folder and

Can a spam e-mail change your life?

Adam Fletcher sure hopes so, because his life is a mess. He’s lost:

His home…

His girlfriend of nine years…

His love of travel…

His hair, and much of his confidence

But then, during an argument with his deeply irritating friend Nick, he checks his spam folder and finds a mysterious invitation to the trip of a lifetime. If he takes it, maybe he can turn everything around?

Except Nick decides he’s coming too.

What could go wrong?

Well, just about everything when Adam:

Fights a mandrill in South Africa armed with only a sock
Tests black magic with a witch doctor’s love spell
Develops an erotic attraction to a purple Cadillac in Havana
Hikes into a volcano to meet people with perhaps the worst job in the world
Visits a bizarre, bloody funeral hosted by the strangest tribe in Indonesia
Learns why it’s a bad idea to become a gold digger in Papua New Guinea

Can he change himself and his life? And if so, will the price be worth paying?

Both about the people who go, and the places they visit, Don’t Come Back is a hilarious travelogue-meets-memoir full of weird characters, awkward situations, and delightfully British humour.

It can be read on its own or as a follow-up to Don’t Go There.

Come on an unforgettable journey today!

Comments

Anonymous says:

Reassuringly honest travel memoirs. This is the second book I’ve read by the author, and I’m not a big reader. I like his style, he tells it from his point of view, bad (or dad) jokes and inner thought processes included. Then there is the content itself, of the places he visits and the people he meets, the moral and the ethical dilemmas you face as a tourist or traveller from the developed world. In other words, I find him relatable. It’s raw and honest and reassuring, thanks Adam.

Anonymous says:

Read this book A great read, funny, honest, self deprecating and made me want to travel more. Although I will pass on the scuba diving and don’t plan to ever revisit projectile vomiting. just reading about it brought it all back. So to speak.

Anonymous says:

Travel I loved this book. It was a mixture of sadness, comedy and self torment. I hate it when a book I’m so engrossed in, finishes. Please Adam, write some more of these emotions. Ty for sharing.Catherine Fox

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