Law’s Strangest Cases: Extraordinary but True Tales from Over Five Centuries of Legal History

October 3, 2019 - Comment

A rollicking collection of barely believable stories from five centuries of legal history – you’ll be gripped by these tales of murder, intrigue, crime, punishment and the pursuit of justice. Meet the only dead parrot ever to give evidence in a court of law, the doctor with the worst bedside manner of all time, the

A rollicking collection of barely believable stories from five centuries of legal history – you’ll be gripped by these tales of murder, intrigue, crime, punishment and the pursuit of justice. Meet the only dead parrot ever to give evidence in a court of law, the doctor with the worst bedside manner of all time, the murderess who collected money from her mummified victim for 21 years, and explore one of the most indigestible dilemmas – if you’d been shipwrecked 2,000 miles from home, would you have eaten Parker the cabin boy? The tales within these pages are bizarre, fascinating, hilarious and, most importantly, true. Revised, redesigned and updated for a new generation of legal eagles, this book is the perfect gift for lawyers, armchair detectives and true crime afficionados everywhere., Word count: 45,000

Comments

Anonymous says:

A witty inside story of what can happen in courts of law. A witty resume of over eighty court cases varying from brutal murder to trivial crimes which have tested the judgement of the country’s best law practitioners. The author adopts a lighthearted approach, using frivolous language and double entendres to highlight the vagueness which can appear in the application of the law and shows how the personalities of those involved can add to the confusion.The brutality of many of the crimes referred to in this book is clear, but Peter Seddon is not…

Anonymous says:

Writing style is for older children, the content isn’t. Many comment on the authors ‘lighthearted’ approach. To me the style is simply childish and seems aimed at a very young audience. After the first few chapters I skimmed the later ones to see if it improved but sadly it didn’t – actually I couldn’t bear to read more of it. It’s a shame because I’m sure many of the cases are interesting in their own right and don’t need a ‘Carry On Dumbing Down’ approach.

Anonymous says:

There is humour in justice. Who would of thought it? Very humorous book about the seemingly unfunny world of justice. It was amazing to note how many of these strange cases took place in our very recent history. A well written book by Peter Seddon that I hope will not be his last.

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