Churchill’s Ministry of Ungentlemanly Warfare: The Mavericks who Plotted Hitler’s Defeat

October 24, 2019 - Comment

In the spring of 1939, a top secret organisation was founded in London: its purpose was to plot the destruction of Hitler’s war machine through spectacular acts of sabotage. The guerrilla campaign that followed was to prove every bit as extraordinary as the six gentlemen who directed it. Winston Churchill selected them because they were

In the spring of 1939, a top secret organisation was founded in London: its purpose was to plot the destruction of Hitler’s war machine through spectacular acts of sabotage. The guerrilla campaign that followed was to prove every bit as extraordinary as the six gentlemen who directed it. Winston Churchill selected them because they were wildly creative and thoroughly ungentlemanly. One of them, Cecil Clarke, was a maverick engineer who had spent the 1930s inventing futuristic caravans. Now, his talents were put to more devious use: he built the dirty bomb used to assassinate Hitler’s favourite, Reinhard Heydrich. Another member of the team, William Fairbairn, was a portly pensioner with an unusual passion: he was the world’s leading expert in silent killing. He was hired to train the guerrillas being parachuted behind enemy lines. Led by dapper Scotsman Colin Gubbins, these men – along with three others – formed a secret inner circle that planned the most audacious sabotage attacks of the Second World War. Winston Churchill called it his Ministry of Ungentlemanly Warfare. The six ‘ministers’, aided by a group of formidable ladies, were so effective that they single-handedly changed the course of the war. Told with Giles Milton’s trademark verve and eye for detail, Churchill’s Ministry of Ungentlemanly Warfare is thoroughly researched and based on hitherto unknown archival material. It is a gripping and vivid narrative of adventure and derring-do and is also, perhaps, the last great untold story of the Second World War. This paperback book has 358 pages and measures: 19.7 x 12.7 x 2.2cm

Comments

Anonymous says:

a compelling read Written with Boys’ Own gusto – which makes for a compelling read. Based on facts which have been carefully researched, the underlying theme is the conflict between very conservative army, navy, air force Services and Civil Service chiefs, and those believing that guerrilla tactics and sabotage were essential tools to win the war. Churchill gave his full support to the latter who then enjoyed apparently unlimited funding.One of the clearest positive outcomes was the design and…

Anonymous says:

Wilder than James Bond – And True. Now this developed fast….and it could only really happen in Britain where being eccentric is celebrated and sheds are places where genius occurs.When I started reading this book I was a little bit disappointed because I thought it was a book that over egged a few oddball people who really were little more than amateurs with little real impact.How wrong I was.Essentially this is the history of a small group of men and women who set up from nothing what would…

Anonymous says:

A fantastic story masterfully told This book really gripped me, so much so that I could scarcely wait for my Kindle FIre to re-charge so that I could finish reading it. The author has written a very detailed account of the creation and development of groups of saboteurs that Churchill wanted ‘ to set Europe ablaze’ by attacking the Nazis in occupied countries using ungentlemanly methods, which were frowned on by army generals and other highly placed officials. The effectiveness of these methods was proved beyond doubt and they…

Comments are disabled for this post.

The owner of this website is a participant in the Amazon EU Associates Programme, an affiliate advertising programme designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.co.uk