A Brief History of Everyone Who Ever Lived: The Stories in Our Genes

August 17, 2019 - Comment

‘A brilliant, authoritative, surprising, captivating introduction to human genetics. You’ll be spellbound’ Brian CoxThis is a story about you. It is the history of who you are and how you came to be., It is unique to you, as it is to each of the 100 billion modern humans who have ever drawn breath. But

‘A brilliant, authoritative, surprising, captivating introduction to human genetics. You’ll be spellbound’ Brian CoxThis is a story about you. It is the history of who you are and how you came to be., It is unique to you, as it is to each of the 100 billion modern humans who have ever drawn breath. But it is also our collective story, because in every one of our genomes we each carry the history of our species – births, deaths, disease, war, famine, migration and a lot of sex. In this captivating journey through the expanding landscape of genetics, Adam Rutherford reveals what our genes now tell us about human history, and what history can now tell us about our genes., From Neanderthals to murder, from redheads to race, dead kings to plague, evolution to epigenetics, this is a demystifying and illuminating new portrait of who we are and how we came to be.’A thoroughly entertaining history of Homo sapiens and its DNA in a manner that displays popular science writing at its best’ Observer ‘Magisterial, informative and delightful’ Peter Frankopan’An extraordinary adventure…From the Neanderthals to the Vikings, from the Queen of Sheba to Richard III, Rutherford goes in search of our ancestors, tracing the genetic clues deep into the past’ Alice Roberts

Comments

Anonymous says:

Great Read Loved this. Possibly my favourite science book for lay people. The style was accessible and although I normally hate foot notes, the ones in this book were helpful and often amusing. I particularly liked the parts about race, very interesting and surprising. And how nice to know I’m descended from Charlemagne. It is a shame that more diseases are not down to a single rouge gene but good to hear that the geneticists are as surprised as I am. I always read a non fiction book along side a…

Anonymous says:

An excellent, enthralling and extraordinary book. Every couple of months I try to read a book that will broaden my understanding of a science and this well-reviewed book on genetics looked interesting. Like many people who are interested in history and archeology I was aware that easily sequencing DNA was something that was changing our understanding but realised that I had very little knowledge of what it could and couldn’t tell us and how it all worked.I expected this book to be accessible to the average reader and teach me more,…

Anonymous says:

written by someone who really knows his stuff and in a largely easily readable form This is a review of the paperback version only. This book is a real eye-opener, written by someone who really knows his stuff and in a largely easily readable form. I will certainly need to read it again for the simple reason that there’s so much fascinating and incredible information in this that it will take at least two readings to take it all in!

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