Seven Myths About Education

August 4, 2019 - Comment

In this controversial new book, Daisy Christodoulou offers a thought-provoking critique of educational orthodoxy. Drawing on her recent experience of teaching in challenging schools, she shows through a wide range of examples and case studies just how much classroom practice contradicts basic scientific principles. She examines seven widely-held beliefs which are holding back pupils and

In this controversial new book, Daisy Christodoulou offers a thought-provoking critique of educational orthodoxy. Drawing on her recent experience of teaching in challenging schools, she shows through a wide range of examples and case studies just how much classroom practice contradicts basic scientific principles. She examines seven widely-held beliefs which are holding back pupils and teachers: – Facts prevent understanding – Teacher-led instruction is passive – The 21st century fundamentally changes everything – You can always just look it up -We should teach transferable skills – Projects and activities are the best way to learn – Teaching knowledge is indoctrination., In each accessible and engaging chapter, Christodoulou sets out the theory of each myth, considers its practical implications and shows the worrying prevalence of such practice. Then, she explains exactly why it is a myth, with reference to the principles of modern cognitive science. She builds a powerful case explaining how governments and educational organisations around the world have let down teachers and pupils by promoting and even mandating evidence-less theory and bad practice., This blisteringly incisive and urgent text is essential reading for all teachers, teacher training students, policy makers, head teachers, researchers and academics around the world.

Comments

Anonymous says:

Punchy and provocative I loved this book. Daisy Christodoulou pulls no punches, is unafraid to take on educational giants such as Dewey and Freire and even aims some potshots at the Queen mother and Prince Harry! Many will agree that in challenging these myths Christodoulou is taking on ideas which we have long felt to be wrong. Facts do not get in the way of understanding. In fact a rich network of facts is understanding. Teacher-led instruction need not be passive; direct instruction is without doubt an effective…

Anonymous says:

Recommend for anyone studying education Balanced, well-researched, and very clear. I loved reading this book, having read so much of the philosophical theories around education I felt like this book was an incredibly clear and balanced counter to so many of the ‘progressive’ theories around education. It does not argue that progressive education is bad and should be done away with (like so many of our politicians do) but rather reminds us to check the viability of these theories in our classrooms. I felt that this book was so…

Anonymous says:

analytical, critical and provocative 4 out of 5First of all, it is a brave book by criticising Ofsted and many established educationalists such as Dewey.Facts vs skills, it is such a clear common sense issue that no one should be confused with. Without knowledge, or the facts, reasoning and higher-order thinking would be baseless. Lucky I never had this problem, with natural science related subject – computing.However, I wasn’t that lucky with transferable skills or the just look it up, or the 21st century…

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