How We Learn: The New Science of Education and the Brain

February 22, 2020 - Comment

Brought to you by Penguin.  In today’s technological society, with an unprecedented amount of information at our fingertips, learning plays a more central role than ever. In How We Learn, Stanislas Dehaene decodes its biological mechanisms, delving into the neuronal, synaptic and molecular processes taking place in the brain.  He explains why youth is such

Brought to you by Penguin. 

In today’s technological society, with an unprecedented amount of information at our fingertips, learning plays a more central role than ever. In How We Learn, Stanislas Dehaene decodes its biological mechanisms, delving into the neuronal, synaptic and molecular processes taking place in the brain. 

He explains why youth is such a sensitive period, during which brain plasticity is maximal, but also assures us that our abilities continue into adulthood and that we can enhance our learning and memory at any age. We can all “learn to learn” by taking maximal advantage of the four pillars of the brain’s learning algorithm: attention, active engagement, error feedback and consolidation.  

The human brain is an extraordinary machine. Its ability to process information and adapt to circumstances by reprogramming itself is unparalleled, and it remains the best source of inspiration for recent developments in artificial intelligence. The exciting advancements in AI of the last 20 years reveal just as much about our remarkable abilities as they do about the potential of machines. How We Learn finds the boundary of computer science, neurobiology, and cognitive psychology to explain how learning really works and how to make the best use of the brain’s learning algorithms, in our schools and universities as well as in everyday life.

Comments

Anonymous says:

The Four Pillars of Education Stanislas Dehaene’s “How We Learn” is an at times fascinating account of education and the brain. He begins with a discussion of machine learning, very much to the fore at the moment, to arrive at some possible definitions as to what learning actually entails. But even the smartest machine does not have the learning ability, says the author, of a baby only a few months old.Recent studies, involving some fascinating experiments described herein, have shown that far from being a…

Anonymous says:

Well researched and well written With 35 pages of references, this book has been well researched and draws on a lot of studies to make its points. It starts by defining learning and explaining why we learn better than machines, which is a particular area of interest for me as I have an honours degree in psychology and an honours degree in ICT and I’m very interested in machine learning and artificial intelligence. Part 2 examines how our brains learn before part 3 describes the four pillars of learning which informs how we…

Anonymous says:

Very good Very good, well structured, rasy-reading. Good for both professional in the field of cognitive psychology, as well as teachers and people in the educational field.Book is very well rssearched, giving 35 pages of references. It gives explanation how we learn, the core mechanism. It explains how our brain is better than machines as per learning.Follows up babies learning development and concludes with the aspects of learning.

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